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Checklist for Interpretation Guidelines for Clause 12 of the Canadian Code of Advertising Standards

Yes

No

1 Is the advertisement, in the expressed opinion of ASC Clearance Services’ Food Section, consistent with the provisions of the Food and Drugs Act and Regulations and the pertinent provisions of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency’s Food Labelling for Industry (CFIA Industry Labelling Tool)? UA
2 If yes, does the commercial message represent mealtime? In particular:
a) is the product in the advertisement depicted as being part of a balanced diet [as per Eating Well with Canada’s Food Guide (CFG)]? UA
b) does the advertisement also depict a “complete” meal? (A meal must consist of at least one serving (per CFG) of meat, fish, poultry, legumes, nuts, seeds, eggs, or milk or milk products other than butter, cream, sour cream, ice cream, ice milk and sherbet; and at least one serving of vegetables, fruit or grain products.) UA
c) if a snack product, is the product in the advertisement depicted as being a snack food and not as a substitute for a meal? UA
3 When the advertised product is shown being used or consumed, does the advertisement:
a) encourage responsible use of the product; or UA
b) discourage or disparage healthy lifestyle choices or the consumption of fruits or vegetables, or other foods recommended for increased consumption in CFG, and Health Canada’s nutrition policies and recommendations applicable to children under 12? UA
  For example, does the advertisement disparage or discourage:
(i) being physically active every day? UA
(ii) eating fruits and/or vegetables? UA
(iii) choosing vegetables and fruit prepared with little or no added fat, sugar or salt? UA
(iv) eating vegetables and fruit more often than juice from vegetables and fruit? UA
(v) selecting from whole grain products at least half the time? UA
(vi) choosing grain products that are lower in fat, sugar or salt? UA
(vii) drinking skim, 1% or 2% milk, soy beverages? UA
(viii) selecting lower fat milk alternatives? UA
(ix) eating meat alternatives such as beans, lentils and tofu? UA
(x) eating fish? UA
(xi) selecting lean meat and alternatives prepared with little or no added fat or salt? UA
(xii) limiting consumption of foods and beverages high in calories, fat, sugar or salt (sodium) such as: cakes and pastries, chocolate and candies, cookies and granola bars, ice cream and frozen desserts, doughnuts and muffins, french fries, potato chips, nachos and other salty snacks, alcohol, fruit flavoured drinks, soft drinks, sports and energy drinks, sweetened hot or cold drinks? UA
(xiii) satisfying thirst by drinking water? UA
4 a) Do the food portions shown being consumed by an individual (either in a food advertisement or in an advertisement for non-food products/services such as films or games in which, incidentally, food is shown being consumed) represent not more than a single serving size that would be appropriate for consumption by a person of the age depicted (per Table 6-3 of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency’s Food Labelling for Industry (CFIA Industry Labelling Tool) or labelled serving size); or UA
  b) Does the advertisement feature an amount of food product that is excessive or more than would be reasonable to acquire, use or, where applicable, consume by an individual in the situation depicted? UA
5 Does the advertisement exaggerate the characteristics of the service, product or premium, such as performance, speed, colour, durability? UA
6 Does the advertisement misrepresent the size of the product? UA
7 Are the results shown reasonably attainable? UA
8 If the product was introduced more than one year ago, is it being represented as “new” in the advertisement? UA
9 Is the product intended for use by children? UA
10 Is the product a drug or vitamin (excluding toothpaste)? UA
11 Does the advertisement directly urge children to purchase the product? UA
12 Does the advertisement ask children to ask their parents to make inquiries or purchase the product? UA
13 If used, are price and purchase terms clear and complete? UA
14 Is the price being minimized by the use such terms as “only”, “just”, “bargain price”, etc? UA
15 If the product requires assembly, does the advertisement communicate this fact? UA
16 If more than one product is being advertised, does the advertisement indicate which products are sold separately? UA
17 Is there a comparison that diminishes the value of a competitor’s product or service? UA
18 Are adults or children portrayed in clearly unsafe acts or situations? (Note: does not apply to safety messages) UA
19 Are products shown in the advertisement being used in an unsafe or dangerous manner? UA
20 Is the advertisement inconsistent with the moral, ethical or legal standards of contemporary Canadian society? UA
21 Does the advertisement imply that without the product a child will be open to ridicule or contempt? UA
22 Does the advertisement suggest that possession or use of the product makes the owner superior? (Note: does not apply to true statements regarding educational or health benefits) UA
23 Does the advertisement use age appropriate language? UA
24 Is there anything in the advertisement that might result in harm to children? UA
25 Does the advertisement collect only the information reasonably required to allow a child to engage in the activity, e.g. the minimal amount of personal information sufficient to determine the contest winners? UA
26 In an advertisement for a contest, game or promotion, is the advertiser limited from dealing with anyone other than the parent or guardian of the winning child? UA
27 a) Does the advertisement require permission from the parent or guardian before a child may provide any information? UA
  b) Does the advertisement make reasonable efforts to ensure that permission from the parent or guardian is given before a child may provide any information? UA
28 a) Does the advertisement attempt to collect financial or private information from a child about any family member? UA
  b) Does the advertisement ask the child to disclose personal information that may identify the child to third parties without obtaining prior consent from the parent or guardian or unless authorized by law? UA

UA – Commercial message is unacceptable because it contravenes the Interpretation Guidelines for Clause 12

Definitions:

Meal: Must consist of at least one serving (per CFG) of:

  • meat, fish, poultry, legumes, nuts, seeds, eggs, or milk or milk products other than butter, cream, sour cream, ice cream, ice milk and sherbet;
  • and vegetables, fruit or grain products.

Eating well and a balanced diet: Young children have small appetites and need calories for growth and development. Serve small nutritious meals and snacks each day. Do not restrict nutritious foods because of their fat content. Offer a variety of foods from the four food groups. Limit foods and beverages high in calories, fat, sugar or salt.

Healthy choices: Make each Food Guide Serving count, eat well, satisfy your thirst with water and be active every day.

Make each Food Guide Serving count: Eat at least one dark green and one orange vegetable each day. Choose vegetables and fruit prepared with little or no added fat, sugar or salt. Have vegetables and fruit more often than juice. Make at least half of your grain products whole grain each day. Choose grain products that are lower in fat, sugar or salt. Drink skim, 1% or 2% milk (or soy beverages) each day. Select lower fat milk alternatives. Have meat alternatives such as beans, lentils and tofu often. Eat at least two Food Guide Servings of fish each week. Select lean meat and alternatives prepared with little or no added fat or salt.

Eat well: Follow Eating Well with Canada’s Food Guide by eating the recommended amount and type of food each day. People should also limit foods and beverages high in calories, fat, sugar or salt (sodium) such as: cakes and pastries, chocolate and candies, cookies and granola bars, ice cream and frozen desserts, doughnuts and muffins, french fries, potato chips, nachos and other salty snacks, alcohol, fruit flavoured drinks, soft drinks, sports and energy drinks, sweetened hot or cold drinks.